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From: Daniel Cook <dcook@jmb.com>
Subject: Hillbilly Morons in Paducah Kentucky, "Children learn about Kwanzaa"
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From: "Daniel Cook" <dcook@jmb.com>
Subject: Hillbilly Morons in Paducah Kentucky, "Children learn about Kwanzaa"
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Posted: Sunday, December 27, 2015 1:22 AM BY KAYLAN THOMPSON
kthompson@paducahsun.com

KAYLAN THOMPSON | The Sun Jaziah Copeland, 6, helps to light the 
candle representing the sixth day of
Kwanzaa, the day the holiday honors the principle of Kuumba, 
meaning creativity. Children learned about
Kwanzaa at a youth activity day on Saturday at the W.C. Young 
Community Center.

KAYLAN THOMPSON | The Sun

Jaziah Copeland, 6, helps to light the candle representing the 
sixth day of Kwanzaa, the day the holiday honors
the principle of Kuumba, meaning creativity. Children learned 
about Kwanzaa at a youth activity day on
Saturday at the W.C. Young Community Center.

A small table laden with red and green decorations was the 
centerpiece of a youth activity day on Saturday
afternoon at the W.C. Young Community Center in Paducah, but it 
wasn't Christmas they were celebrating. It
was the first day of Kwanzaa, and a dozen children gathered 
around to light the seven candles of the kinara, a
candleholder, hearing what each flame represented.

"This candle in the middle is black, standing for the people," 
said Rose Lowery, chairwoman of this year's
Kwanzaa events, in a hushed, reverent tone as the children gazed 
on.

"The red stands for the struggle of our people, and the green 
candles stand for hope. There's an order in which
we light them, too. We always go from struggle to hope, red to 
green, because we struggle and then hope to get
better."

Kwanzaa, a celebration of family, community and culture, begins 
the day after Christmas and ends on New
Year's Day.

"This is not to take the place of Christmas, the celebration of 
Christ; we'll always do that," Lowery said. "It's to
teach us that we don't have to have all of these things to have 
a celebration. It's about learning to use your gifts
to celebrate, the gifts that you have, your gifts of creativity 
and of supporting one another."

The holiday was created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga in 
response to the 1965 Watts riots in Los Angeles
that rendered many homes ravaged. It was Karenga's hope to bring 
the African