From: Mayayana <mayayana@invalid.nospam>
Subject: Re: On "real" photography vs collage
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From: "Mayayana" <mayayana@invalid.nospam>
Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
Subject: Re: On "real" photography vs collage
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2017 18:23:58 -0400
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"Alfred Molon"<alfred_molon@yahoo.com> wrote

| Imagine if a couple goes to a doctor one day and with a nice genetic
| engineering machine they design the perfect baby by modifying the DNA of
| their egg cell and sperm, the way they want it to look and be.
| And on the computer screen, in a photorealistic simulation, they see how
| this person will look like when it's 1, 5, 10, 20 ... years old.

   Interesting idea. I wonder if it's really possible,
though. I went to grade school with identical twin
girls. Over the years they became less identical.
Different builds. different temperaments. noticeably
different faces. Yet identical genes and very similar
childhood environment.
   It makes me think of The Portrait of Dorian Gray.
We wear our minds as our bodies, to some extent.