Subject: Re: Inca Trail and Battery Charging
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From: PeterN <"peter,newdelete"@deleteverizon.net>
Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
Subject: Re: Inca Trail and Battery Charging
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 13:29:25 -0400
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On 11/1/2017 5:38 PM, -hh wrote:
> On Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 1:31:00 PM UTC-4, PeterN wrote:
>> [...]Good quality high capacity cards are not cheap.
> 
> I guess this depends on what one considers 'cheap' or not.
> 
> For example, a random "good" CF card at B&H today is $80 for
> a 64GB card, or $1.25/GB.  That's downright cheap in comparison
> to how much memory cards cost 5, 10 (or more) years ago.
> 
> And for this $80, at roughly 30MB per (RAW+JPG pair) image,
> it represents 2000+ photos ... that's 10 days at 200 images/day
> (or 5 days @ 400/day, etc).
> 
> 
>> I would find out at which points there are provisions for
>> back ups to the cloud.
> 
> YMMV.  I've found that I can travel lighter (and without a
> laptop) by simply "throwing money" to have more cards.
> Specifically, enough to last the whole vacation so that
> I don't need to carry the extra weight of a laptop or to
> spend time finding an internet kiosk that I could upload.
> 
> For example, I got a new camera last year and caught a nice
> sale at B&H:  paid $100 for 192GB (2@32GB + 2@64GB).  Lexar
> 800x UDMA CF Cards.
>    
> 
>> As I see it power for batteries is the biggest problem.
> 
> Yup...but again, when compared to the cost of an international
> vacation, another 4 * $50 = $200 for batteries (or whatever)
> that you'll be able to repeatedly use for the next ~5 years
> worth of vacations is an expense that's an initial nuisance,
> but not really a big deal when viewed in context of how many
> such trips it will be an enabler.  Ditto for buying a second
> battery charger for redundancy (risk reduction) for $20:
> 
> <https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/837451-REG/watson_c_1517_comp...
> 
> 
>> Depending on their camera's battery usage, figure battery
>> usage per day, and bring bring enough batteries to get them
>> to the charging station furthest from the preceding station.
>> While there is a fair amount of  planning involved. it is
>> worth doing so.
> 
> 
> Agreed, and the data requirements really aren't all that bad;
> just need:
> 
> A = # of days away from next chance for power
> B = # of days away from the next-after- of "A", above
> 
> C = expected # of photos per battery pack for camera A, B, (etc)
> D = expected # of photos you expect to take on each day
> E = risk management fudge factor (percentage)
> 
> Thus:
> 
> A*(D/C) = minimum number of battery packs expected to be used
> 
> (A*(D/C)*E) + (B*(D/C)*E) = "Risk management" practical upper limit
> 
> Applying some notional numbers for a single camera:
> 
> A=4
> B=2
> C=800 (Canon 7D's CIPA standard, w/Optical Viewfinder)
> D=300
> E=+50% margin
> 
> The minimum number of battery packs expected to be used:
> = A*(D/C)
> = (4 days)*(300pix per day/800pics per battery)
> = 1.5 batteries ... so take two.
> 
> The "Risk management" practical upper limit:
> = (A*(D/C)*E) + (B*(D/C)*E)
> = (4*(300/800)*1.5)+(2*(300/800)*1.5)
> = 2.25 + 1.225 = 3.375 batteries ... so take four.
> 
> Similarly for memory cards,
> 
> F = Camera's average # shots per 32GB card (or whatever)
> (for a Canon 7D, assume ~1000 shots per 32GB card)
> 
> The minimum number of 32GB cards expected to be needed:
> = A*(D/F) = (4 days)*(300 shots per day / 1000 per 32GB card)
> = 1.2 cards ... so take 2 cards
> 
> The "Risk management" practical upper limit:
> = (A*(D/F)*E)+(B*(D/F)*E)
> = (4*(300/1000)*1.5)+(2*(300/1000)*1.5)
> = 2.7 cards ... so take 3 cards
> 
> Alternatively:
> 
> G = total length of vacation
> H = number of days in G where the shots/day rate from D applies
> J = average # of shots/day for where H doesn't apply (such as in-transit)
> 
> Let:
> 
> G = 14 days
> H = 4 days
> J = 100/day
> 
> Total trip memory card "magazine depth" requirement estimate:
> 
> = (H*(D/F)*E)) + ((G-H)*(D/F)*E)
> = (4*(100/1000)*1.5)+(14-4)*(300/1000)*1.5)
> = (0.6) + (4.5)
> = 5.1 cards ... so take six
> 
> (or cut it closer by refining to 5.1*32GB = 163GB required)
> 
Depends on the camera, and file settings.
D800 shooting at 14bit uncompressed RAW is 74.4 MB.
D500 shooting at 14bit uncompressed RAW is 25.0 MB.

Other modes have considerably less. Basic arithmetic will tell you that 
you cannot get thousands of images when shooting at 14 bit uncompressed 
NEF.
That is why I said it depends on the camera and shooting mode. I 
typically shoot at 14 bit RAW. Others may not, and there are times when 
I don't. (I will not get into a debate about bit depth, I like to do 
tings that way, have done lots of reading and testing.)




-- 
PeterN